SET OF ELEVEN BLUE-PRINTED BOTANICAL PEARLWARE DINNER PLATES

WITH MATCHING MEAT PLATTER

Impressed mark: WEDGWOOD/PEARL/  5 (printed underglaze in blue)

Etruria, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, c. 1810-1815

Each plate with a delicate gold border and a blue on white stylized floral pattern representing tree peonies.

Diameter: 10,” each.   Platter: 18½” x 13¾”

Condition: Excellent.

Wedgwood’s botanical patterns can be dated to 1810-1815 when Josiah’s oldest son, John, became involved with the firm.   John Wedgwood was a founding member of the Royal Horticultural Society and it is believed that his interest resulted an a number of botanical patterns produced by the firm at this time.   A set of eleven dinner plates with matching platter in this botanical pattern is both vanishingly rare and ravishingly beautiful.  In homage, Wedgwood makes a modified pattern available today that is based on this original design, which the firm calls “Hibiscus.”

“Pearlware,” thought to have been developed about 1779 by Wedgwood, was a Wedgwood brand name for a “China Glaze” that English potters developed earlier to create a purer white background for blue-printed dinner ware.[1]  The white earthenware body contained a greater percentage of flint and white clay to which a small amount of cobalt was added to enhance the whitening effect..[2]

More fine English porcelain is available on this site, here. Additional information about blue-printed pearlware can be found on the site of the Wedgwood Museum.

E-AAA-213158


[1] Miller, George L. (1987) “Origins of Josiah Wedgwood’s “Pearlware”,” Northeast Historical Archaeology: Vol. 16 16, Article 6. https://doi.org/10.22191/neha/vol16/iss1/6 Available at: http://orb.binghamton.edu/neha/vol16/iss1/6

[2] Wolf Mankowitz, Wedgwood (London: B.T. Batsford Ltd., 1953), 44.

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